NV Giavi Conegliano Valdobbiadene DOCG Prosecco Superiore (But you can just call it “Giavi”)

So how was everyone’s Bastille Day? All was great here at TWH. Many of our friends stopped by to pick up their French wines for the festivities, and our Bastille Day dinner with Chateau Coutet at Range Restaurant was a big success!!! (Look for a recap of the event in form of a blog post soon!) Now that the dust is settling from that momentous occasion, I find myself next plotting … nothing; for the moment, anyway. Speaking of momentous occasions, by the way, we’ve got one kicking off at noon local time. The 2011 Women’s World Cup Final should provide plenty more fireworks than one can normally expect to see on a football pitch in mid-July. We’ll take it; Go USA!!! Now, what to take along (or have handy in case celebration is in order)? Just yesterday our eyes were opened to yet another new arrival from our recent Italian container. Doubling the number of directly imported Proseccos, it is our pleasure to introduce you to the Giavi Prima Volta Conegliano Valdobbiadene D.O.C.G. Prosecco Superiore!

In 1969, the Prosecco D.O.C. was established in north-eastern Italy, located roughly from the Veneto (including Venezia itself) to Friuli (all the way to eastern outpost Trieste). The sweet spot for quality, however, is confined to 15 municipalities located between the villages of Conegliano and Valdobbiadene. In 2009, this sweet spot was awarded the D.O.C.G. status. This is the most prestigious status that can be awarded to any vinous region in Italy. The letter “G” stands for “guaranteed” as each bottle of D.O.C.G. wine is given a number, making it unique and guaranteeing its quality. Keep in mind that in Italy, there are 300 D.O.C. wines, yet only 40 with the vaunted D.O.C.G. status. And that’s saying something. Maybe that’s why David socked away a bottle of this new arrival in the fridge to be opened in commemoration of Emily’s recent birthday.

Like it or not, packaging is important. Sometimes, we just say no to a wine that may be of quality, but sports a tacky label. Sad but true. So first impressions matter. With the Giavi? The package passed with flying colors. It is one classy looking bottle, isn’t it? Let’s just go on to say, that if the package works but the wine doesn’t … oh well, we don’t buy it. That should go without saying, we are TWH after all. So yes, we’re all standing around the tasting table in a semi-celebratory state, and pop went the cork! The first noticeable thing were the tiny bubbles. I was a minute late to the unveiling (hey, someone’s got to answer customers’ questions) and have a vivid screenshot of David smiling and commenting on the size of them. I poured myself some, and just as Anya commented on the color, I was quite taken as to just how pale and frosty it looked in my glass. The aromas sang of that delightful tandem of fruit and mineral; the palate was dry and mineral driven, with a hidden fruitiness that was described as, “a hint of grape Jolly Rancher”. Just a hint, mind you. Its acidity gave it a particular freshness, which carried through to a happy finish. Smiles all around. Thanks Emily, for having a birthday on the same day that the Italian container arrived!


Wow. July 17th. I remember back in April when I first came back from Bordeaux. “So when are we doing this?” “When are we doing that?” My friends peppering me with questions about spring/summer plans. My answer, “Talk to me in mid July”. Here we are. Talk to me. First up, the World Cup Final! I fear I may need to bring 2 bottles. One to open before the match, and one just in case. It is only 11% after all. – Peter Zavialoff

SPECIAL NOTE: Be on the lookout for our weekly E-mail only Wednesday Wine Deal starting next week. TWH’s way of saying thanks for reading…

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Filed under Italy, Peter Zavialoff, Prosecco, Sparkling wine

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