2009 Château Larrivaux, Haut-Médoc – Do we Really Get A Fourth Chance?


While we patiently await the results of the ongoing harvest all across the northern hemisphere, it’s a good time to remember the vintages past. All of them. The interesting ones. The underrated ones. The classic ones. And, of course, the legendary ones. Looking back upon the past decade of red Bordeaux vintages, it has become a given that 2009 and 2010 have etched their places among the latter two. Before we knew of the power and structure the 2010 vintage gave us, 2009 was eye-opening for its precocious expression and charm. Though, let us not dismiss its potential for aging. We are speaking of red Bordeaux after all. For the classified growths, well, discipline is in order. You’re going to want to hold onto those. Savvy Bordeaux enthusiasts well know that in these type of years, the weather blessed everyone, therefore bargains abound. We could go back and count them, but who has the time? There is a 2009 red Bordeaux that we thought enough of out of barrel, that we bought a modest amount of. We sold about half our allocation as futures, but when it landed here at TWH, the balance was swept up before I could get my hands on a single bottle after taking off a poorly timed three day weekend. Somehow, some way, we were able to get a little more 2009 Château Larrivaux, Haut-Médoc!

For those who know this wine, not much more needs to be said. As I stated, our first drop was gone in a heartbeat. We bought another pallet. Gone. Then another. Gone. Oh well, time moves on, and there are new wines waiting to be discovered. Hold on a second. When we receive new stock lists from our suppliers in Bordeaux, I usually look them over pretty thoroughly. What? 2009 Larrivaux? Really? “David, you’ll never believe what XYZ negoce is offering!” We bought what was left (not much). And now it’s here, back in stock.


Briefly – Château Larrivaux is in the commune of Cissac in the northern sector of Bordeaux’s Haut-Médoc. It is really a 3-wood west of Saint-Estèphe. The property is run by Bérengère Tesseron, and she has been cranking out some impressive wines for quite some time, a bit under the radar. We’re not talking about big, extracted, over-oaked monsters. Her wines are nuanced, elegant, and complex. The 2009 has what it takes to lay down for another decade or more, but it’s so enjoyable now, why not indulge? Seriously, for the price, it’s easy to imagine a Wednesday evening’s slow roasted beef ribs with the fixin’s, a bottle of this, and who cares if you can’t get a reservation at (insert fancy resto name here). It just makes sense; from a flavor standpoint and a budget one, it just makes sense.

We’ve written a blog post, or two (scroll down), or three, about this wine. After this email lands in our inboxes, this too, will live as another one. There’s really not much more to say. 2009 Château Larrivaux is back in stock; most likely, for a short time.

Speaking of harvest, I have spent the past week, and will spend the next on assignment in Slovenia, where the harvest is in full motion. From one perspective, it’s not optimal, as everyone is so busy, it’s difficult to grab the attention of any winemakers around here. That being said, it’s a beautiful country, and it’s almost enough to be stomping around the vineyards, observing the hard work which they undergo, gathering their fruit from the vines. They make time to explain things to us when they can, and it has been a great learning experience. Heck, when all is said and done, I look forward to stashing some 2016 Slovenian wines in my cellar. I probably have some time to achieve that. As far as the 2009 Château Larrivaux goes, I will have to act now. There might not be anything left by the time I return. Na Zdravje!Peter Zavialoff

Please feel free to email me with any questions or comments about 2009 red Bordeaux, Bordeaux in general, European Football, the six Bay Area Wilco shows, or anything Slovenia: peter@wineSF.com

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Alsatian Auxerrois – Say That Five Times Fast!


 

2014 Pinot Auxerrois From Saint-Rémy

What is Pinot Auxerrois? Pinot Auxerrois is a grape that is planted extensively throughout the Alsatian region of France. It is not always labelled as such as it is legal under AOC Alsace appellation laws to label it under the more commonly recognized Pinot Blanc. Many people will explain that Auxerrois is a clone of Pinot Blanc but that is not accurate. In fact Pinot Auxerrois is an offspring of Pinot Blanc, which is a white-berried mutation of Pinot Noir, and is a sibling to Chardonnay, Aligote and Melon de Bourgogne. Pinot Auxerrois has smaller berries than Pinot Blanc so then when yields are limited, a truly interesting wine can be made like the 2014 Pinot Auxerrois from Domaine Saint-Rémy.

Saint-Rémy’s bottling of Pinot Auxerrois comes from the single-vineyard, Val St. Gregoire. Val St. Gregoire is close to Grand Cru Brand, has southern exposure and the soils are more granitic. I remember when Philippe Ehrhart, proprietor of Domaine Saint-Rémy, visited us at the store in the summer of ’14 and explained these facts. He also made a point of saying that at Saint-Rémy they do not use commercial yeasts, and give a very gentle pressing to the grapes to get pure, clean juice. The Pinot Auxerrois stays on the lees for 6-8 months before bottling. The Ehrharts have taken their centuries old domaine to new heights by converting to organic farming. They became certified organic in 2010 and certified biodynamic in 2012. Phillipe and family are strong advocates of this movement in their region. This fastidious stewardship of the land is rooted in tradition but is also a very real solution to climactic and ecological threats.

As I mentioned above, Pinot Auxerrois has smaller berries than Pinot Blanc with a higher skin to juice ratio so when made well there is good structure, fruit and acidity. Both Pinot Auxerrois and Pinot Blanc can get flabby (true for most of us!) if not taken care of properly. I find the Saint-Rémy Pinot Auxerrois to have plenty of fruit flavors – peach, apricot – a nice bitter tinge and freshness to the finish. This combination makes it delicious to enjoy by the glass sans food or easily adaptable to appetizers. I was particularly impressed at how well it went with my usual Friday Night Fish Fry of baked sole. Typically I reach for something with a leaner fruit profile, but the wine carried the dish beautifully without overpowering it. I’d say go ahead and serve this with poultry and light pork dishes too. It is really quite versatile.

I’ve survived a full month of back to school scheduling. Twice I’ve forgotten it was my turn in the carpool to do “drop-off”. In a moment of panic, my daughter is surprising compliant at jumping in the car with a hastily clad mother. My husband has been cracking himself up by reenacting my reaction when I finally figure out that they are not the ones late…I am! So when Friday rolls around, and I finally have a moment to myself, you might find me on the front porch with a glass in hand. This week the 2014 Pinot Auxerrois Val St. Gregoire was a lovely reward to a busy week. The golden, honeyed fruit mirrored the soft hues of the autumn sun’s rays. Aahh, the restorative nature of wine!– Anya Balistreri

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2011 Château Malescot St. Exupery, Margaux



As our end of summer sale continues, it’s hard to just point at one or two wines as “must haves” because there are some great values in every corner of the shop. If every corner means that there are wines from Bordeaux on sale, well, that’s where I’m headed first! Today’s stroll through our Bordeaux bins stopped dead in its tracks in front of this bin.


Come on. Really? This is Malescot St. Exupery. It’s a Cru Classé (3rd Growth). The 2010 goes for $85. The 2009 goes for a hundred. While 2011 may not be as famous a vintage as either of those, there is plenty to like about this wine apart from its below-market price.

I remember tasting the red wines from Bordeaux’s 2011 vintage from barrel very well. It wasn’t as fruit forward or charming a vintage as 2009 was, and it wasn’t a bombastic vintage with big fruit, big structure, and big alcohol as 2010 was. As far as the fruit expression went, in general terms, it was a little bit on the shy side. There were many wines with ample structure and balance, they just seemed like they were going to need time in the cellar before they would be pleasurable to drink. I remember the Malescot St. Exupery had a big profile for a Margaux out of barrel. There was a solid core of dark cherry fruit, but being a barrel sample, it was still shrouded in tannins and acidity. There was certainly potential there. Fast forward two years, now in bottle, and the black cherry fruit character was enhanced. The structure still ate it all up; the tannins were grippy, though if you knew where to look, you could have made a good argument that the wine would be something special some day. After reading through the notes on this wine in CellarTracker, and taking them into consideration with my own opinions and observations, I’m guessing that this wine is about 2 or 3 years from hitting its drinking window, and when it gets there, it will provide pleasure for another 15-20 years.

Funny thing, as underrated as the 2012 vintage turned out to be, the 2011 vintage seems even more under the radar. When I was in Bordeaux this past spring, I had several conversations with suppliers and chateau owners about these two vintages. Something I heard again and again was that 2012 was indeed the better of the two. Right now, that is. All involved were of the opinion that beginning around the year 2020, the 2011’s would begin to strut their stuff, and we will then be able to recognize how successful the vintage really was. The wines just need time. The time is almost at hand.

Here are Robert Parker’s notes for the 2011 Château Malescot St. Exupery:
“This small estate (only 130,000 bottles were produced in 2011) has been on a qualitative tear for a number of years. A fragrant perfume of spring flowers, black raspberries, blueberries and cassis is followed by a wine with medium-bodied, juicy flavors, sweet tannin and a broad, generous mouthfeel. A terrific 2011, it should be at its peak in 2-4 years, and last for 15 or more. Bravo!”

I must admit that I have a soft spot for Margaux. Saint Julien is my favorite Bordeaux appellation, but it was in Margaux where I had two lapses in professionalism during my first En Primeur trip. As we were headed north on that first day of tastings, John was behind the wheel. I started seeing the signs … Château La Lagune. A while later came Cantemerle. Still further up the road, Siran, and then one turn and BAM!!! My jaw dropped. “Chateau Paaaalllmmmerrrrr,” I must have sounded like a kid who sees Disneyland for the first time. We spent the day in Saint Estephe, Pauillac, and Saint Julien, and as we headed back, our last appointment was fittingly at Château Margaux (my Bordeaux epiphany occurred with the 1988). As we headed to the chai to taste, we walked in front of the columned château and I broke down and asked John to snap a photo of me with the château in the background. Not exactly unprofessional, but still, not exactly what a pro would do.

Further blurring the lines between work and play, rather than heading home each day this week after we close, I’ve been commuting to the Fillmore Auditorium to spend time with Wilco and some friends. It has become rather work-like in its scheduling and routine of meeting up with friends, heading into the show and enjoying live performances from yet another new album. As I said to my best friend during a moment of musical mastery during Wednesday night’s show, “I’m just pointing out how lucky we are.” I have happily met a few customers at the shows, and I would think that trend will continue. Last night, our good friend Tim (whom I’ve seen at Wilco shows in the past) saw me in the line to get in and introduced me to his pals as his “wine pusher.” Well Tim, if you’ve got wines along the lines of 2011 Château Malescot St. Exupery in your cellar, I’m perfectly okay with that title. Happy Weekend! – Peter Zavialoff

Please feel free to email me with any questions or comments about Wilco’s new album, Schmilco, the 5 shows at The Fillmore, 2011 Bordeaux, or English Football: peter@wineSF.com

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The September 2016 Dirty Dozen


The Dirty Dozen

September is here! What? What? What? No need to worry, summer isn’t over just yet. There’s still plenty of time left to get in a last visit to the beach or the last barbecue of the season. Fall is right around the corner, so we better act quickly! Good thing there’s a Dirty Dozen to take care of the wine department for the month: 12 bottles of wine, all different, all versatile, a little cheat sheet with some notes and pairing ideas, and one low price. Yay!

Reorder Special !!! 20% off 6 bottles or more of any one regularly priced Dirty Dozen wine! Or 10%/Net Wines – 5%/ Sale Wines

2014 Santa Barbara County White, Demure $15.98 net price, $14.38 reorder
Owner/winemaker Vailia Esh left chilly Toronto on a lark and set out for sunny Paso Robles. Shortly thereafter Desperada Winery was born. Along with the Desperada wines, Vailia tinkers with different varietals, and here she has blended 88% Riesling with 12% Chardonnay for her Demure label. It’s dry and crisp, so pair it with those pork chops.

2014 Rueda Verdejo, Menade $11.98 net price, $10.78 reorder
Three siblings, Marco, Richard, and Alejandra Sanz have been running Menade since 2005. They can trace their winemaking roots back 5 generations. Rather than rest on that laurel, they are true pioneers in the organic movement, having secured the certification for their vineyards. This Verdejo is stony and herbal – a great partner for raw oysters.

2014 Vinho Branco, Rufo do Vale D.Maria $12.98 net price, $11.68 reorder
From Portugal’s Douro D.O.C. comes this blend of natives Côdega de Larinho and Rabigato. The former brings floral aromas as well as flavors of peaches and melons while the latter brings a little zippy acidity and backbone to the party. As the summer fades away, treat yourself to a glass of this to sip with a Caprese Salad with fresh heirlooms and burrata.

2013 Hors Saison, Domaine la Hitaire $9.95 sale price, $9.45 reorder
It’s a Côtes de Gascogne made from 70% Sauvignon Blanc and 30% Sémillon. Brothers Rémy and Armin Grassa run this property now after taking over from their father, Yves, of Domaine de Pouy fame. The 2013 Hors Saison is an easy going, medium bodied white, perfect for Tuesday nights. It goes great with goat cheese or a turkey sandwich with the works.


2014 Ventoux Blanc, Domaine Fondrèche $16.99, $13.59 reorder
Our man in Ventoux, Sébastien Vincenti blends Grenache Blanc, Roussanne, Clairette, and a little bit of Rolle for his Ventoux Blanc, and the result is smashing. Like their red counterparts, white Rhône blends have to be some of best values on the market. Citrus, stone fruit, and minerals hover around your glass as you toast your Chicken à la King.


NV Vouvray, Domaine d’Orfeuilles $16.98 net price, $15.28 reorder
Sparkling wine made from 100% Chenin Blanc, this Vouvray is long on character. It’s not Champagne, but its small bubbles and dusty mineral expression could potentially fool a few people. The palate is marked by crunchy Granny Smith apple and mineral, and the finish is balanced and creamy. Great for a toast, an aperitif, or a bucket of fried chicken.


2012 Vinho Tinto, Rufo do Vale D.Maria $12.98 net price, $11.68 reorder
We head back to Portugal’s Douro for Vale D.Maria’s red version of Rufo. This one is made from a blend of Touriga Franca and Portugal’s most famous red grape, Touriga Nacional. It’s a medium-bodied wine offering notes of dark red and black fruit with some spice. It’s great with tapas and small bites, or you can pair it with a pizza margherita.


2014 Negroamaro Salento Arcangelo, Palamà $11.98 net price, $10.78 reorder
Originally planted by Romans in the southern region of Salento, Negroamaro is a robust red with sturdy structure and pleasant black cherry aromas. The tannins are well integrated making this a clean, easy sipper which can be appreciated in its youth. It’s a versatile red, so it’s a ringer with pasta dishes; but we’re thinking bread, olives, and salumi.


2014 Merlot, Domaine de Gournier $12.98 net price, $11.68 reorder
Longtime Dirty Dozen fans may remember Gournier, as their wines were once regulars in our monthly sampler. When we discovered several cases that were up for grabs at a ridiculous price, we snagged them. This Merlot is juicy and balanced with brambly fruit and a medium body. It’s a great picnic red (screwcap), or a fine partner for a cheeseburger.

2013 Mountainside Shiraz, The Winery of Good Hope $13.49, $10.79 reorder
Speaking of great picnic wines, Alex Dale’s Mountainside Shiraz sports a screwcap as well, and what’s inside is pure Shiraz magic. The nose is ripe and expressive with notes of red fruits, smoke, and gamey meat. The palate is restrained and medium bodied, and the finish is exquisitely balanced. This one is best suited for a slow-cooked smoky beef brisket.


2014 Les Trois Frères, Domaine des Aspras $17.59, $14.07 reorder
Say bonjour to our new Provençal producer, Domaine des Aspras. Coming from the first all-organic French grape growing village, Correns, Les Trois Frères is 90% Syrah and 10% Cabernet Sauvignon. This Côtes de Provence is a dark, earthy wine. It’s full bodied, so it’s best to pair this with something hearty … maybe a nice, rich bowl of cassoulet.


2013 Costières de Nîmes Les Cimels, Château d’Or et de Gueules $15.79, $12.63 reorder
“Wines with this much complexity don’t sell for $15,” that’s what Anya said after she tasted the 2013 Les Cimels in our employee tasting room. This has been THE go-to house red for over a decade. Dark purple and black olive-like fruit are the core with aromas of forest floor and black tea. One note of caution: this bottle will be empty before you think it will!

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True Extreme Sonoma Coast Pinot Noir – Fort Ross

Fort Ross Vineyard & Winery
Back in the early years at TWH’s tenure on Carolina Street, a woman with long black curly hair walked in to our store, introduced herself and proceeded to ask a lot of questions about our business – who we were and what we did. Her South African accent beckoned John Carpenter out of his office, who before opening The Wine House had lived and taught for two years in Johannesberg during the early 70’s. They hit it off right away as this woman, Linda, was a whirlwind of energy with many interests. The upshot of the encounter was that Linda and her husband had planted a vineyard and were planning to make wine. She promised to come back to the store when they finally had it bottled.

all photos courtesy of the winery

This Linda that we met at The Wine House turned out to be Linda Schwartz of Fort Ross Vineyard and Winery, who with her husband Lester, purchased 976 acres of coastal land just north of where the Russian River meets the Pacific Ocean in 1988. Rather than hire people out to do the work, the Schwartz’s decided to become the experts themselves. Linda enrolled in viticulture courses and soon discovered yet another talent. In 1991 they began the first stages of their vineyard project by planting a test vineyard with an assortment of various trellis systems, varietals, clones and rootstocks, to learn what grew best in this extremely cool/high elevation climate. By 1994 they knew they needed to plant Chardonnay and Pinot Noir and then took the next 10 years to plant nearly 55 acres.

Though Linda and Lester are involved in all aspects of the winery, to help them with the arduous task of making wine from this challenging terrain, they hired a winemaker. In 2009 they met and hired renowned winemaker Jeff Pisoni. This collaboration has propelled the winery further towards excellence as the latest releases from Fort Ross are stunning and quite frankly, right up my alley as far as domestic Pinot Noir is concerned. For my taste, the fruit is present and deep, but notably restrained vis á vis most Sonoma Pinot Noirs and the structure is firm yet silky. It all comes down to the vineyard, and there is little doubt that the one the Lesters planted is quite exceptional. Fort Ross Vineyard lies at elevations between 1200 to 1700 feet and is said to be the closest to the Pacific Ocean; about a mile away as the crow flies. Anyone who has ever driven along Highway 1 in these parts knows how blustery and cold it can be even when temperatures are spiking 10 miles inland. The vineyard pops up above the fog line and is able to produce ripe grapes despite the coastal weather.

There are two wines from Fort Ross that we’re offering: 2013 Pinot Noir Sea Slopes and 2012 Pinot Noir Symposium. The Sea Slopes is blended for earlier release from various clonal selections and is aged in 100% French Oak of which only 10% is new. The grapes are hand-harvested at night before the pre-dawn light. A colleague of mine worked harvest at Fort Ross last year. He told me they picked in the dark with lights on their heads, just like a miner, from 2 to 9 am picking bunch by bunch…back breaking work! The Symposium is a darker, more brooding wine, with pronounced black fruit flavors and warm spice notes. The kicker here is the inclusion of 4% Pinotage. I don’t believe anyone could actually pull out flavors of Pinotage from the wine, but clearly it adds something to it.

The long Holiday weekend will find me enjoying family time not too far away from Fort Ross Vineyard & Winery up at the family dacha. September is my favorite time of year at the beach on the River; the riff raff is mostly gone and the sun’s rays are more golden and gently warming. The Redwoods have begun to drop their needles and our heritage pear tree is ready to ripen all at once. According to my Instagram feed, grape harvest is in full swing all over California. Fort Ross is probably getting close, but out along the coast, harvest comes mid to late September. There is a lot of excitement out there as winemakers are thankful for August’s cooler than usual yet sunny days. Here’s to their good and successful labor! Anya Balistreri

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Filed under Anya Balistreri, Barbecue Wine, Pinot Noir, Sonoma Coast

Grower Champagne For Summer: NV Pascal Doquet Grand Cru Le Mesnil Sur Oger Blanc de Blancs



Every once in a while, a customer will ask us how we resist temptation, working in a place surrounded by bottles of wine from all over the world. The answer is: we don’t resist it; we like wine, so we drink it. Okay, we spend far more time here in the shop than any customer would, so from a time spent in shop per bottle purchased ratio, it may appear that we do resist temptation … most of the time. While stocking our sales floor this morning, it wasn’t a surprise to find several empty bins that needed refilling. Apart from their emptiness, the other thing these bins had in common were the orange sale signs; there are a solid dozen or so wines around the shop that I would consider outright steals now that they have been marked down. On the short list of the finest of these wines is the NV Pascal Doquet Grand Cru Le Mesnil Sur Oger Blanc de Blancs Champagne.

For me, Champagne is one of those wines that I unfortunately don’t get to drink as often as I would like, but before the orchestra of the world’s smallest violins starts up, I will say that I do make a point to do so from time to time. For celebrations, it’s a given. To pair with fried chicken, it’s a must. To share a meal and some time with someone special, a toast with real Champagne makes it complete. Several years ago, I wrote about summer and Champagne, and heeding my own advice, I’m not going to let summer go by without continuing the tradition.

We’re all fans of quality Grower Champagnes in general, though we’re even bigger fans of the wines produced by Pascal and Laure Doquet! The wines have layers of complexity which have garnered the attention of esteemed critics and TWH customers who love Champagne. This non-vintage, 100% Chardonnay Grand Cru Champagne has expressive aromas of citrus blossoms, apricots, pears, and a sleek, stony mineral nerve. On the palate, one gets a hint of brioche in addition to the fresh fruit, mineral, and a hint of hazelnut. The finish is high-toned and perfectly balanced. It’s a stunning wine at a very fair price. Champagne isn’t cheap, but the sale price on this one makes it one sweet deal!


We’re one week shy of Labor Day Weekend, which for some of us comes with an extra celebration. Another TWH tradition worth mentioning is that birthdays for staff members are celebrated with something sparkling at the end of the day. I think we now know what I’ll have a hankering for next week: The NV Pascal Doquet Grand Cru Sur Oger Blanc de Blancs Champagne. What temptation?Peter Zavialoff

Please feel free to contact me with any questions or comments regarding sale wines, Champagne in summer, Bordeaux, or English Football: peter@wineSF.com

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Filed under Champagne, Chardonnay, Peter Zavialoff, Sparkling wine

A Taste of Burgundy – August 2016


A Taste Of Burgundy


TOB-BANNER Basic Facts for those of you who are new to the program: Every two months we select two Burgundies, one red and one white. We include write-ups detailing the background of the grower, the vineyard source, and the wine. Finally we knock a significant percentage off the prices of the wines, making the Sampler price $89.98. If you would like us to add you to the Sampler Club and receive the wines regularly, please notify us in the comments field, and we will charge your card accordingly. If you would like us to ship faster than the standard ground service, please specify this as well.

 

2013 Puligny-Montrachet 1er Cru Les Perrières, Domaine Pernot-Belicard

Despite the challenges presented during the growing season, the bottled 2013 white Burgundies have proven to be of fine quality. Much like 2007, it’s a great vintage for those who enjoy sleek, crisp, snappy wines with balance and freshness. TOB regulars need no introduction to Philippe Pernot, grandson of Puligny legend, Paul Pernot. Marrying into a family of winegrowers with holdings in both Puligny-Montrachet and Meursault, Philippe and his wife farm over 6 hectares of them. In Puligny-Montrachet, you can find Premier Cru Les Perrières along the same slope as neighboring Clavoillon. Continuing in a southwesterly direction, Les Pucelles comes next, followed by Bâtard-Montrachet. That is one special slope! The 2013 Pernot-Belicard Puligny Perrières is a racy, mineral-driven Puligny with fine lemon peel, wet stone, and spicy vanilla aromas. The palate is crisp and complex as the fleshy apple pie fruit stays in balance with the zesty freshness leading to that snappy finish. Drinking window: Now – 2023.

2013 Chassagne-Montrachet 1er Cru La Boudriotte, Château de la Maltroye

Jean-Pierre Cornut couldn’t help mentioning his good fortune as his holdings were spared from the hailstorms that hit the northern part of the Côte de Beaune in 2013. And believe it or not, despite the overall reports of diminished yields from the vintage, Jean-Pierre’s reds came in as expected with very little sorting required! “The quality of the 2013’s was a huge surprise as I honestly didn’t expect it,” Cornut added. He also mentioned that he felt that the transparency of the terroir was more significant in 2013 than any recent vintage, including 2010. His Premier Cru La Boudriotte vineyard in Chassagne-Montrachet produced an outstanding wine in 2013. The nose is alive with fresh red berry fruit, earthy minerals, herbs and spice. The brambly fruit and earthy tones are concentrated mid-palate, with the zippy freshness holding the structure all together. There is rich complexity on the finish, suggesting the wine can be enjoyed in its youth, though we recommend you drink it from 2018 through 2029. – Peter Zavialoff

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Filed under A Taste of Burgundy, Burgundy club in San Francisco, Chardonnay, Chassagne-Montrachet, Peter Zavialoff, Pinot Noir, Puligny-Montrachet, Wine Clubs/Samplers