BEDROCK SONOMA SYRAH

2008 Bedrock Wine Company Syrah Sonoma County
Red Wine; Syrah/Shiraz; Sonoma;
$17.48
Add to Cart
I was listening to an interview with Jakob Dylan on the way in to work today. It provoked me to think about how often we find ourselves following family tradition in terms of occupation, even when we try our hardest to choose other paths. Are you a talented songwriter because it’s in your genes or because you’ve been around music all your life? This discussion applies as well to winemaking. Many of the French producers we import are family enterprises having made wine for generations. The wine industry in California is still in its infancy relative to Europe. However, I am starting to notice a trend: the newcomers who are making me take notice are “next generation” winemakers. Case in point is Morgan Twain-Peterson, son of Joel Peterson the founder/winemaker of Ravenswood Winery. I first tasted Morgan’s Bedrock Heirloom, an extraordinary field blend from 120-year old vines, last year. We were only able to get a bit of wine, and therefore it never even made it into any of TWH newsletters. I’ve been told that Morgan began making wine at the age of 4 or 5. Why or why didn’t my parents throw caution to the wind and buy that piece of land in Dry Creek back in the 70’s? Anyway, I have since tasted a range of Morgan’s wine under the Bedrock Wine Company label and I am impressed. The 2008 Sonoma County Syrah is not only impressive but is a bona fide BARGAIN. Yes, a bargain and here is why. First, you are getting a hand crafted, small production Syrah for under $20. Second, the grapes come from unique sites in Sonoma County that, had it not been for a challenging time for ultra premium wines, would have been bottled separately and given, deservedly so, a $30-$40 dollar price tag. And lastly, you get an opportunity to taste a wine from a winemaker who may not yet be a household name, but is starting to generate the kind of buzz that eventually will make his wines impossible to get. There you have it.
This weekend I am ending my seven-week abstention from meat. And just in time, as a new Supermercado has opened in my neck of the woods. In a sadistic move, I perused the Carniceria last week. All I can say is my husband better have filled the propane tank! The 2008 Sonoma County Syrah from Bedrock is going to be the wine to take me into that culinary paradise where seasoned flesh meets succulent Syrah. I want that burst of berry fruit followed by spice and velvet texture and I know that Bedrock’s Syrah will deliver. I have included Morgan’s informative notes about the wine below. Happy Pascha! –Anya Balistreri
2008 Bedrock Wine Company Syrah Sonoma County
Red Wine; Syrah/Shiraz; Sonoma;
$17.48
Add to Cart
So, what’s in the bottle? The backbone of the wine comes from Bald Mountain Vineyard. Located at 2000′ feet on Sonoma side of Mount Veeder, the vines are dry-farmed and yield puny amounts of super-concentrated fruit. To this I added a puncheon of highly perfumed juice from Lauterbach Hill Vineyard in the Russian River Valley, a couple barrels of Glenlyon Vineyard on the backside of Sonoma Mountain, a barrel each of clone 877 from Kick Ranch and Old Lakeville Vineyards, along with a splash from Wildcat Mountain Vineyard. All the lots were fermented with whole-clusters (25-80%), native yeasts, and were manually punched-down and basket pressed. The final wine saw about 20% new French oak, but the exact amount is hard to calculate (what does a puncheon count as?). The final wine is elegant, food-friendly, spicy, and perfumed. It is the St. Joseph of the Bedrock line-up—delicious, nutritious, and affordable!
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Filed under Anya Balistreri, California

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