Chateau Moulin de la Grangere

The 2009 Chateau Moulin de la Grangère has turned me into a young Bordeaux drinker. As a general rule, I don’t drink young Bordeaux. It is probably because I have been spoiled, courtesy of TWH, by well-aged, characterful, seamless Old Bordeaux which were graciously shared at special occasions. I like how Bordeaux tastes when the primary fruit fades to the background and the secondary and tertiary flavors emerge. Who doesn’t?  Sometimes I don’t like young Bordeaux because I find it disjointed and a bit clumsy – not so true with 2009 Bordeaux. It is the exceptionally expressive fruit of this vintage that makes them so delicious to drink right now. ’09s tasted great out of barrel, just after bottling and continue to do so, not unlike the ’82s, or so I’ve been told. It occurred to us here at TWH that in a favorable vintage such as ’09, it would make sense to search beyond the famous chateaux to find wine of quality and affordability. We like to call these wines, petits chateaux. The first half of this year was dedicated to a lot of cork pulling, spitting and following our collective instincts as to what we know to be correct, delicious Bordeaux. As Pete mentioned in last weekend’s offering, we have several new arrivals from 2009 that each in their own way merit consideration.  I happened to settle upon Chateau Moulin de la Grangère as my pick because I find that at barely above $20, you can begin to enjoy the elegance and refinement of graceful Bordeaux with this Saint-Émilion Grand Cru. 

 

The chateau is near the town of St. Christophe-des-Bardes east of the village of Saint-Émilion and enjoys south-facing vineyards. The vineyards are planted to Merlot mostly with additions of Cabernet Sauvignon and Cabernet Franc and have an average vine age of 30 years. That round voluptuous, sumptuous texture of Merlot grown on clay soils is what dazzles the palate. The 2009 Chateau Moulin de la Grangère shows a hint of mintiness when you first pop the cork but soon moves into deep plum laced with cedar and warm toast notes. With some aeration, the wine gains weight and complexity. The tannins slide smoothly over the tongue and mouth, making it all too easy to consume a glass without giving it a second thought. 

 

I have been drinking wine long enough now to include myself into that group of wine drinkers who will begin a lament with something like, “I remember when (high-scoring wine) only cost (insert ridiculous low price)!” Well the wine world has changed and first growths are not going for $100 any longer. But if you like to drink Bordeaux, I mean really enjoy a well-made, quality claret, the good news is if you look beyond the usual names and perhaps take the advise of a wine merchant who has over 30 years experience in the Bordeaux business (like TWH!!!), there are delicious options. A good place to start is the 2009 Chateau Moulin de la Grangère with its dark red fruit flavors, dusty cedar notes and perfectly balanced structure for drinking tonight or putting a case aside to revisit every so often.
I have already bought several bottles of our newly arrived 2009 petits chateaux. And instead of satiating my taste for Merlot and Cabernet Sauvignon, I want more. Too much of what I brought home has been carelessly consumed while watching sports on the flat screen in the late evening with my husband. What I really would like to do is defrost those lamb shanks I’ve had in the freezer and slow-braise them till they fall off the bone and ladle them atop stewed white beans and drink a glass of this fabulous Saint-Émilion, the 2009 Chateau Moulin de la Grangère! Sunday dinner, planned! —Anya Balistreri
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Filed under 2009 Bordeaux, Anya Balistreri, St. Emilion

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