2013 Marsannay From Domaine Bart


Burgundy Bonanza!!!
Domaine Bart

Martin Bart and his nephew Pierre have made truly inspired 2013s. They take a back seat to no recent vintage. Bart makes nine, count ’em, nine, different Marsannays. Normally I buy two or three of my favorites, feeling that there’s no reason to confuse everyone. In 2013 I bought eight of the nine. They’re all fabulous, in their own way, and if you value terroir in your Burgundy, you’ll be thrilled by any of them.

They’re all slightly different, each parcel with varying degrees of calcaire, clay, marl, and each with slightly different expositions, varying degrees of stems retained in the wine, very small variations in the amount of new oak (none have more than a third, most less than that), but all are farmed in the same manner, all are fermented using only natural yeasts, and all are bottled without fining or filtration. Several are micro cuvées – the Les Saint Jacques, for instance, was three barrels – 75 cases for the world. The Clos du Roy, just two.

Below are my tasting notes from my visit at Domaine Bart in November 2014, just before the wines were to be bottled. First, the Marsannays:


13ouzeloyOuzeloy – significantly more concentrated than Finottes, lots of black cherry, deep sandy soil, 15% new oak. This sure bodes well for the group. *
longeroies13

 

 

Longeroies – calcaire, marl, gently sloping parcel; intense fragrance, delicious, structured, very nice sweetness *+

 

13montagneMontagne – more rocky soil, nearly south facing slope, similar profile to Longerois, with maybe just a touch more plump middle. *+

13echezots

 

 

Echezots – more limestone on this parcel; good acidity, a bit closed down at first, but with air it sings. Both red and black fruits, very complex already. *(*)

 

13stjacquesSt. Jacques – 3 barrels; 1 new. Bigger scaled than all the others before it; needs time, but all the parts are there. This is serious wine. *(*)

13grvignes

 

 

Grandes Vignes – 20% whole clusters. Yes, it is “grand.” very concentrated, structured, deep, long, lots of black fruit and spice.**

 

13closroyClos du Roy – 50+ year old vines. same soil composition as Bonnes Mares – mainly calcaire 50% whole clusters. A step up, even from the St. Jacques and Grandes Vignes. This reminds me of 1er Cru Gevrey Chambertin; would love to sneak this into a Gevrey tasting.**

13salomon

 

Champs Salomon – Also 50+ yrs old. This has even more grip. That’s why he poured it after the Clos du Roy. Again, layers of dark fruit, with plenty of structure. The richest wine of the group. *(*)

These have the structure along the lines of 2005 or 2010. An incredibly impressive lineup.

 

Then, we have the glorious Grand Crus. These two vineyards came to Domaine Bart, as did much of their Marsannay, from the dissolution of the once-venerable Clair-Daü estate in the 1980’s. We get miniscule quantities of these, and they are worth seeking out!

13closbezeChambertin Clos du Bèze –5 barrels made from 1/2 ha. 40% stems, but impossible to tell. Incredible perfume – violets, black fruits, spice, and it’s plush and seamless on the palate. I could just smell this all day. Dense, but with no rough edges. Oh la la! ***

13bonnemares

Bonnes Mares – 10 barrels. Bart’s parcels are next to those of Comte de Vogüe. Bigger structure than the Clos de Bèze, quite a powerful wine. Gorgeous fruit quality that lasts and lasts, with a stony/mineral note; long, intense, so expressive. Wow. ***

These two wines will age effortlessly for two decades. Both are absolutely worth the price, and really, they’re bargains when compared with similar Grand Crus from other producers. Both are extremely limited. – David Netzer

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Filed under David Netzer, Domaine Bart, Marsannay, Pinot Noir

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