2014 Château de Raousset Fleurie “Grille-Midi”


Over the course of any given day here at TWH, we have conversations about a great many things. With two musicians on staff and our speakers tirelessly serenading us, music comes up a lot. But this is a wine shop, so conversations about food and wine are a daily occurrence. The other day, Chris and I were talking about Nouveau Beaujolais. He said that he’s never tasted it. I told him that it is usually a light, simple, fruit driven wine. He went on to say that sometimes, the situation may call for simple, yet enjoyable. I get it, but from a value standpoint, it’s overpriced. If you want to taste good value wines from Beaujolais, their top wines, the Cru Beaujolais are pretty darned good values; and they’re pretty tasty too!

In brief, Beaujolais is a region that sits just south of Burgundy in central France. Its red wines are made from Gamay Noir. The wines tend to be light in body, with aromas of wild berries, flowers, herbs, forest floor, and mineral. Of course, vintages, producers, and terroir vary, so different wines will have different characteristics. The finest vineyards of the appellation are called Beaujolais’ Growths, or Crus in French. There are 10 of these Crus, you can find them on the map above. Fleurie is often described as having the prettiest name, reflective of its wines’ personality. I won’t argue with that. I’ve written about Château de Raousset’s Fleurie before. Now that the 2014 Fleurie “Grille-Midi” is here in stock, I’m writing again.

Comparing this Cru Beaujolais to Nouveau isn’t fair. So I won’t. The 2014 vintage was exceptional in the region. Some are saying that it is the best vintage in Beaujolais since 2005, and that’s saying something, as they’ve had 5 great vintages since then. The wines are expressive in the fruit department and are brimming with aromatic complexity. They can be enjoyed now, though most will benefit from another 3-6 years of aging. When Jeanne-Marie de Champs was here last month, we tasted a lot of Burgundy. I did mention there were other wines. The 2014 Fleurie from Raousset was one of them. And it did not disappoint. The aromas are rich and striking. Layers of wild berry fruit. Spice. Forest floor and a little bit of earthy something. The palate – fresh and intensifying. It’s all about the red berry fruit, with the forest floor spice, and lively acidity holding it all together. It’s another winner from the producer who Jeanne-Marie always describes as “a great grower.” I mean it’s great just tasting it here in the tasting room, but I am imagining how good it would be with the right meal.

I took a little time out from my usual Friday routine last night and enjoyed a nice dinner with a longtime buddy of mine whom I haven’t seen in well over a month! This particular pal of mine is one of my wine tasting friends, and it’s always a pleasure to hear his descriptors when tasting. Any of my stories that have ever featured smoked or barbecued meat occurred at his house. Quite the handyman, he’s in the process of renovating his kitchen … as in tearing everything out, including the drywalls. So with nowhere to whip up any side dishes, we went out. We hit a quandary when it came time to choose the wine. He was going with red meat and I wanted chicken. We ended up settling for wines by the glass, which set off some negative comments about by the glass pricing in some restaurants. If only I had thought to bring a bottle of 2014 Fleurie from Château de Raousset, then we both would have been happy!Peter Zavialoff

PS: If you’re going to have red wine at the traditional Thanksgiving table, Cru Beaujolais is a mighty good choice!

Please feel free to contact me with any questions or comments about Beaujolais, Bordeaux, Thanksgiving wine, or English Football: peter@wineSF.com

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Filed under Beaujolais, Fleurie, Gamay, Peter Zavialoff

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